Category Archives: Psychology

Misconceptions of Schizophrenia

A recent article focused on Separation of Church and State because a governor in the US does not believe in mental illness.

Van Gogh

Van Gogh

In that article, I spoke of the mentally ill who become violent through no fault of their own.

However, in my passion for writing about the interventions that are needed across America, I neglected to point out that not everyone who is mentally ill becomes violent.

I was shocked to realize that I had contributed to the misconceptions and stigmas associated with mental illness, and for that, I am deeply ashamed and am committed to be more mindful while writing content in the future.

Michael Hedrick’s article on “5 Things You Should Know About People With Schizophrenia revealed how important it is to make sure people understand the many nuances of a mental illness, or a physical illness.

While it is true that some people can become violent or threaten violence, it is certainly not the case for all people coping with schizophrenia. I know people with schizophrenia that are coping well with their illness.

I’ve also known of precarious situations, such as when a friend pulled a gun on a person she loved because the patient thought the loved one was spying on them for the government. This particular situation did not end in violence or harm. The problem was that the patient was not on medication because she had not been properly diagnosed, even though she exhibited symptoms.

Doctors cannot read minds. It is up to the family and the patient to properly inform a physician so that proper referrals and a diagnosis can be made. Another problem in receiving proper treatment is that often the patient will not allow anyone to accompany them to the doctor, therefore the doctor has no information other than what the patient gives him or her.

But – there are also people like Michael.

Read Michael’s story at Psychology Today. In it, he successfully dispels some misconceptions of Schizophrenia.

 

 

Gestalt Empty Chair Therapy

The Empty Chair

The Empty Chair

Gestalt Therapy

AKA the Empty Chair Therapy

Gestalt Therapy utilizes an empty chair to give a client a safe way to express previously unspoken feelings and emotions.

Developed by Fritz Perlz. Laura Perlz. Miriam and Erving Polster.

Stress is on placed on awareness and integration of the functioning of body and mind. The intention is to expand a person’s awareness of the present moment.

Gestalt therapy has developed over time and is currently supportive, accepting, empathetic, respectful, and challenging. It is an holistic approach to the personality in the present moment.

• During therapy, the client is encouraged to bring out hidden feelings.
• Much use is made of the ‘open chair’ technique.
• This is when the client sits opposite an empty chair and then mentally places into that chair someone significant, who has caused him or her pain or trouble.
• The client then tells the ‘person’ in the empty chair what they have been unable to express before.
• Sometimes the client is encouraged to swap chairs and to answer his own claims or accusations from the other person’s perspective.
• This technique can give rise to emotional scenes, and the previously buried emotions need to be handled carefully.