Category Archives: Therapies

Mindfulness for Schools

According to UrbanDictionary.com, the term “urban youth” refers to young black people living in the city. I don’t know if that’s correct or not, but it does have relevance to what I am about to talk about.

Earlier today, I saw an article on FaceBook, posted by the American Psychological Association (APA) regarding urban youth and the problems they face. What disturbed me was the comment by an obviously disengaged viewer. I have included a snapshot of the comment below.

The post stated:

Many urban ‪#‎youth‬ are repeatedly exposed to significant negative stressors including violence, poverty, and substance use. A new study suggests that a ‪#‎school‬-based ‪#‎mindfulness‬ program may lessen effects of these stressors. apapsy.ch/school-mindful‪#‎mentalhealth‬

The post linked to this article:

School-Based Mindfulness Program May Help Urban Children Deal With Negative Stress, which is linked to PsychNews.org.

Ignorant comment

As you can see, I did not black out my name with my response to this person. I am still shocked by such disregard for the problems that face people today. Those with no problems seem to have no heart or mind for hearing about the unpleasantness of growing up without money and resources.

What this male does not understand is the definition of pathetic. What is pathetic is the attitude of people sharing his belief that education should not include teaching people how to cope with desperate situations, how to have hope in the midst of trouble, and how to remain focused on preparing a better future for yourself.

There are many mindfulness curriculums already in effect in many inner city schools.

Goldie Hawn has had success with her curriculum on mindfulness, which is sold through Scholastic. You can read more about her program, MindUp, and the many great reviews at the Hawn Foundation.

You can also follow their progress on their FaceBook Page.

Mind Up provides this extremely affordable curriculum in three age groups, covering ages 3 to 14. You can find them at http://store.scholastic.com.

It is never too late to learn to be mindful, to learn to still the mind and focus on this moment, which is all we truly have for certain.

Become mindful of your power to create a better future.

Become mindful of your power to create a better future.

You can also purchase tools for using at home. If you know a student who would benefit from the art of mindfulness, perhaps consider becoming a mentor and teaching this unique yet simple approach to a small group.

Meanwhile, let us continue to expand the awareness of those people who are out of touch with the realities and suffering of young people all over the world.

Namaste.

 

 

Gestalt Empty Chair Therapy

The Empty Chair

The Empty Chair

Gestalt Therapy

AKA the Empty Chair Therapy

Gestalt Therapy utilizes an empty chair to give a client a safe way to express previously unspoken feelings and emotions.

Developed by Fritz Perlz. Laura Perlz. Miriam and Erving Polster.

Stress is on placed on awareness and integration of the functioning of body and mind. The intention is to expand a person’s awareness of the present moment.

Gestalt therapy has developed over time and is currently supportive, accepting, empathetic, respectful, and challenging. It is an holistic approach to the personality in the present moment.

• During therapy, the client is encouraged to bring out hidden feelings.
• Much use is made of the ‘open chair’ technique.
• This is when the client sits opposite an empty chair and then mentally places into that chair someone significant, who has caused him or her pain or trouble.
• The client then tells the ‘person’ in the empty chair what they have been unable to express before.
• Sometimes the client is encouraged to swap chairs and to answer his own claims or accusations from the other person’s perspective.
• This technique can give rise to emotional scenes, and the previously buried emotions need to be handled carefully.