Tag Archives: depression

Dementia and Anger

Realizing that your loved one is suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease can be devastating. Regardless of how much you learn about the progression of such conditions, it can still be shocking and heart-breaking when your loved one exhibits extreme symptoms of dementia and anger.

Knowing what to do and how to handle potential situations can help alleviate the stress of care-givers. This article addresses anger and aggression issues that may arise with those suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease.

confusion

 

Sometimes anger can lead to aggressive behavior, which can lead to a potentially dangerous situation not only for your loved one, but also for those caring for them.

Safety – with compassion – is the priority.

While it may sound insulting, the truth is that the best way to deal with a confused person affected by dementia, is by alleviating their fears, much like you would with a small child.

Most of the chaotic emotions Alzheimer’s patients are dealing with stem from their lack of understanding about what is happening to them, their confusion about where they are or who they’re with, and their loss of what they believe to be their every day life, which in reality was lived many years or even decades ago.

Try to remember this.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia patients are living in a time warp that makes no sense to them; they are scared and confused.

It can be shocking when your loved one exhibits extreme symptoms of dementia. Click To Tweet

elderly couple

 

First, reassure them that you are taking care of whatever issue has them upset. You could also name another person that they trust and say that they are handling the situation.

Affirm that everything is going to be fine.

Second, find something to get them involved with that will divert their attention.

A short walk through the house might work, while talking about furniture, artwork, house chores, etc. Perhaps they can fold some towels, look at some photographs, put a puzzle together, or check on some houseplants to see if they need watering. Maybe it’s time to eat a meal or a snack, or just have a cup of water, tea or juice.

Be creative and be prepared.

If folding clothes works for your loved one,
then always have a basket of towels nearby that they can fold.

 

activities

 

Reasoning with your parent might not be the best option. Instead, say what you need to in order to make them feel safe or reassured. So, if they are demanding to go home, don’t tell them they already are home. Instead, explain that they can’t leave right at that moment because the weather or traffic is bad.

 

Resources:

 

What to Do When Your Parent Exhibits Aggressive Behavior As a Result of Alzheimer’s

 

 

 

kindness is never wasted

Benefits of Lithium Orotate

This article discusses Lithium Orotate, a mineral supplement required by the body, that, when taken properly with supplementation, can have positive effects on specific conditions.

Most notably, Lithium Orotate can help alleviate stress almost immediately in some instances, and can also help maintain a positive mood.

If you’ve ever been frustrated by well meaning individuals who tell you “How” to feel better by simply thinking good thoughts, then this information may be helpful to you.

Frustrating meme:

 

Obviously, thinking good thoughts is always a good idea and can actually be beneficial to all people some of the time. However, it’s not that easy for some people and it does not work for all people, all of the time.

Sometimes the mind spits out an equally effective thought form that negates any benefit from the original positive thought. Usually the new, negative thought form is simple and sarcastic, yet very effective.

Example:

“Good morning world! I am in a good mood today!”

Immediate mental response:

“Yeah, right. I’m healed. Hallelujah.

What idiot came up with that?”

 

There is hope.

In many cases, doctors will administer antidepressants to help foster a more positive outlook. Again, the SSRIs do not work for everyone. In these cases, alternative choices, such as supplementation, are a viable option, especially in this case.

Remember that lithium orotate is a mineral that is required by the body. The supplementation form is not the same as the prescribed medicine known as Lithium, which is given at high dosages that can have adverse side effects.

Cost of supplementation…

One of the biggest obstacles to self-treating with supplementation is the cost factor. The good news about Lithium Orotate is that it is affordable.

This is the brand I use:

This product is manufactured in the USA at an FDA inspected cGMP and 3rd party rated facility. It comes in vegetarian capsules and is gluten free. No soy, no dairy. See label for more details.

This item: Weyland: Lithium Orotate – 5mg of Elemental Lithium per Vegetarian Capsule.

Dose:

Most people begin with 5 mg tablets or capsules. This is a safe dose, taken once a day. If a smaller dose is preferred, you may want to look at Ionic Lithium, which is in liquid form administered with a dropper.

 

Please Note.

This information is NOT about the prescription drug, Lithium, which is administered at much higher dosages and has different, sometimes adverse effects.

 

 

Benefits of Lithium Orotate.

  • Combats depression
  • Helps relieve anxiety
  • Improves cognitive function
  • Has anti-aging effects
  • Helps with OCD behaviors
  • Protects from environmental toxins
  • Supports the eyes
  • Supports the liver
  • Reduces inflammation
  • May help with conditions that cause involuntary muscle movement

 

Remember:

Thinking good thoughts can be beneficial to all people some of the time, but not often enough… Click To Tweet

 

For more information:

 

Disclaimer:

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Consult a qualified medical professional before beginning or altering your medical regimen.

Does Facebook Make You Happy

There is an article circulating that states that those who give up Facebook are happier.

Unfortunately, people reading such articles rarely read the entire article to see the actual findings, how many people participated, and where they were from. support_groups_on_facebook

This particular research included a mere 1095 Facebook users. The study was done in Copenhagen, so I would assume that is where the participants lived, but that is not necessarily so. The study was conducted by The Happiness Research Institute

Let’s break down the findings from the study of 1095 people, which does not even make up 1% of the people using Facebook, but that doesn’t seem to matter to researchers.

Scientifically speaking, it is perfectly fine to use a sample group and then make generalizations about the overall population. However, you would normally have a more inclusive representation of daily users. If you are going to use such a small sampling, then you should summarize the findings based on their common characteristics, which have to be more than the fact that they use Facebook every day.

Some of the questions I would want answered are:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Do they live alone, or with how many do they live?
  • Do they spend most of their time at home alone?
  • Are they working?
  • Are they taking care of others in the home, such as children or ill loved ones?
  • Are they disabled in any way?
  • Are they depressed regardless of their use of Facebook?

Now think about those questions and how they might affect someone who logs in to Facebook every day. If you live alone, then Facebook helps you have contact with the outside world. The drawback is that it can also make you envious of what others are able to do, but at least you have contact. The same scenario applies if you are disabled or stuck at home as a caregiver.

Perhaps your family lives in another state and you don’t see them often. Then Facebook becomes a vital tool in keeping those relationships current and active.

As you can see, personal circumstances and satisfaction with life in general will have an effect on all of your experiences, including your time on Facebook.

So how can we truly say that Facebook or the lack thereof will make you happier?

Now we’ll take a look at the findings of this “study.”

Take note of the numbers such as:

  • 39% are more likely to be less happy… which means 61% (majority) feel at least as happy if not happier than their friends.
  • 5 out of 10 which is half or 50% which is basically a coin toss, envy amazing experiences of others.  Interestingly, I also envy “some” amazing experiences regardless of where I learn about them.
  • 1 out of 3 envy the happiness of others on FB, which means that 2 out of 3 are not envious, which is the majority.
  • 4 out of 10 envying the success of others likewise means that they are in the minority because 6 out of 10 or 60% are not feeling envious of other people’s success or appearance of success on Facebook.

The actual quote on the findings:

“People on Facebook are 39% more likely to feel less happy than their friends,” reads the study. “Instead of focussing on what we actually need, we have an unfortunate tendency to focus on what other people have […] 5 out of 10 envy the #amazing experiences of others posted on Facebook. 1 out of 3 envy how #happy other people seem on Facebook. 4 out of 10 envy the apparent #success of others on Facebook.”

 

If you’re still interested in this study in spite of the fact that they misspelled focusing and in spite of the fact that it is utter nonsense, you can read more about it where I discovered it at SocialMediaWeek.com.

You can also download the report from the Happiness Research Institute.

Meanwhile, don’t worry. Be happy that millions of people can connect with each other using Facebook, or can connect with support groups, hobby groups, religious groups and political groups as well as fan groups and so much more.

The risks and the dangers of Facebook are minimal when compared to the benefits of its existence.

Thank you Mark Zuckerburg.

MarkZ